Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 8th Euro Global Summit on Cancer Therapy Valencia, Spain.

Day 1 :

OMICS International Eurocancersummit-2015 International Conference Keynote Speaker Colleen Huber photo
Biography:

Colleen Huber NMD is a Naturopathic Medical Doctor in Tempe, Arizona. She is President of the Naturopathic Cancer Society. She is Co-Founder and Secretary of the American Naturopathic Research Institute / Naturopathic Oncology Research Institute (ANRI / NORI), and Co-Chair of the International Naturopathic Clinical Research Institute (INCRI) at www.NaturopathicStandards.org. She is a Fellow of the Naturopathic Oncology Research Institute. She is the owner and Medical Director of NatureWorksBest Medical Clinic. The data supporting the clinic’s results in cancer treatment is on the website www.NatureWorksBest.com. Dr. Huber is a credentialed physician at Phoenix area sub-acute in-patient facilities, where she practices up to the full-scope of practice for naturopathic physicians licensed in Arizona. She graduated from Southwest College of Naturopathic Medicine in Tempe. Many of her health articles have appeared on www.mercola.com. Her book, Choose Your Foods Like Your Life Depends On Them, as well as her cancer treatments and cancer prevention, which have been featured in the Defeat Cancer book. She authored the largest and longest study in medical history on sugar intake in cancer patients, which was reported in thousands of media outlets around the world in 2014. Her academic writing has appeared in The Lancet and Cancer Strategies Journal, and other medical journals.

Abstract:

Introduction: Research has shown that for cancer to occur in the body multiple normal functions must break down. Therefore multiple-component treatments may be the only successful way to treat cancer. We used well-tolerated natural substances to assess their usefulness in combination anti-neoplastic therapy. The following has been the goal of our clinic in treating cancer patients: It is not enough to repair genetic damage or to stop angiogenesis and neglect to reverse all other cancer-causing problems. It is also not enough to attack metastases and leave the primary tumor in a comfortable environment. In order to defeat cancer, it must be attacked at every level and with every method necessary to reverse cancer’s multiple-layered assault on the body, even if that means that some of the various treatments have redundant effects. And this all must be accomplished while maintaining the maximum possible wellbeing of the patient and without sickening or weakening the patient. rnrnMethods: We treated a total of 379 patients with cancer from October 2006, when we opened our practice, until July 1, 2014, when we stopped collecting data for this year’s update of this paper, originally written in 2009. Data from all 379 patients who came to us with a diagnosis of cancer are included in this paper, excluding only those cancer patients who decided against further treatment after less than two weeks in our care. Patients’ stage is recorded as the stage at first arrival to our clinic, which is not necessarily the stage when first diagnosed. We treated with natural methods alone, choosing among methods with research-established anti-neoplastic effect, oral and intravenous, dietary and supplemented, nutritional and herbal, having a preference for those with high patient tolerance and compatibility, and varying with individual needs and tolerance, according to the standard naturopathic principle of “Treat the whole person.” rnrnFindings: Many patients voluntarily left our practice, against our advice, primarily for financial reasons, while still having cancer. Of the remaining patients, 175 either went into confirmed, complete remission, which we define by no evidence of cancer remaining in the body on imaging, or have remained in good to excellent wellbeing, as determined retrospectively by prolonged stable health of at least 6 months after leaving our care and needing no other physician supervised cancer care, and as confirmed by annual telephone conversation with either the patient or a family member. Those patients in remission stayed in our care an average of 3.7 months; those who left, 2.7 months, (this data last measured in 2010). Eight additional patients went into remission after leaving our clinic, and while being treated at a different clinic, and it is unlikely that our treatments were the decisive factor in that remission. We were still treating 22 patients at July 1, 2014 plus giving ongoing maintenance treatments to some of those who are still in remission. 44 died while still our patients. Of those 44, 12 died after a significant dietary dispute with us. That is 32 patients died although they received our treatments and complied with our requested diet. 22 more were killed by hospital procedures and/or chemotherapy and/or radiation side effects while still our patients. 45 total patients chose to have chemotherapy while having our treatments. Yet, of the 175 who went into remission, only 12 had chosen to have chemotherapy while having our treatments. Stages 1, 2, 3 and early Stage 4 patients at start of treatment had much better outcomes than late Stage 4 patients in general. rnrnInterpretation: The 32 patients who complied with our dietary and treatment protocol and still did not survive their cancers must be seen as an 8% failure rate if considered of all 379 patients, or a 15% failure rate if taken of the 210 patients who stayed to complete our treatments. Therefore, these treatment strategies are still not adequate to eliminate all patients’ cancers and must be further developed. However, our success rate of 93% in steadfast patients following all protocols as recommended, from Stage I through early Stage IV is unprecedented and unequalled in both conventional and natural medicine in all clinics that report their results in detail as we do in this paper. There is also a 93% rate of sustained remission in individual patients who elect to follow our recommendation to have monthly follow-up treatments. 26 of those 28 patients are still in remission. 27 of those patients are alive and well (97%). Because of this consistent success in treating cancer since 2006, we believe that the experiences of over 300 cancer patients detailed below has demonstrated the need for simultaneous well-tolerated anti-neoplastic treatments, across all cancers and stages of cancer.rn

Keynote Forum

Xiaoming Yang

University of Washington School of Medicine, USA

Keynote: Interventional molecular imaging in oncology

Time : 10:00-10:30

OMICS International Eurocancersummit-2015 International Conference Keynote Speaker Xiaoming Yang photo
Biography:

Abstract:

Recent common interest on molecular imaging among both diagnostic radiologists and interventional oncologists has led to establishing a new concept, called “Interventional Molecular Imaging.” This concept, by combining interventional oncology with molecular imaging, is aiming to fully apply the advantages of both imaging and oncology fields. Interventional oncology can extend the capabilities of currently-available molecular imaging techniques, to (i) reach deep-seated tumors; (ii) get a close look at early and small tumors; (iii) precisely guide delivery of non-targeted imaging tracers/therapeutics into the tumors and (iv) super selectively enhance effectiveness of targeted imaging and treatment of tumors. On the other hand, molecular imaging can be used to (a) precisely guide interventional oncology procedures and (b) sensitively access the responses of tumors to the interventional oncological therapies. Interventional molecular imaging is becoming one of the frameworks to bring advanced molecular imaging and interventional oncology technologies from benches/small animal labs to large animal suites, and ultimately to clinical applications in humans.

Keynote Forum

Vladimir P Torchilin

Center for Translational Cancer Nanomedicine, USA

Keynote: Stimuli-sensitive combination nanopreparations of siRNA and chemotherapeutic drugs to treat multidrug resistant cancers

Time : 10:30-11:00

OMICS International Eurocancersummit-2015 International Conference Keynote Speaker Vladimir P Torchilin photo
Biography:

Vladimir Torchilin is University Distinguished Professor and Director, Center for Pharmaceutical Biotechnology and Nanomedicine, Northeastern University, Boston. He has published more than 350 original papers, more than 150 reviews and book chapters, wrote and edited 10 books and holds more than 40 patents. He is Editor-in-Chief of Current Drug Discovery Technologies and of Drug Delivery. He is a Member of European Academy of Sciences, Fellow of AIMBE, AAPS and CRS, and received many important national and international awards including the 2013 Blaise Pascal Medal in Biomedicine from EAS. In 2005, he was a President of the CRS and in 2011 Times Higher Education ranked him number 2 among top world scientists in pharmacology for 2001-2010.

Abstract:

Tumor therapy, especially in the case of multidrug resistant cancers, could be significantly enhanced by using siRNA down-regulating the production of proteins, which are involved in cancer cell resistance, such as Pgp or survivin. Even better response could be achieved is such siRNA could be delivered to tumors together with chemotherapeutic agent. This task is complicated by low stability of siRNA in biological surrounding. Thus, the delivery system should simultaneously protect siRNA from degradation. We have developed several types of lipid-core polymeric micelles based on PEG-phospholipid or PEI-phospholipid conjugates, which are biologically inert, demonstrate prolonged circulation in the blood and can firmly bind non-modified or reversibly-modified siRNA. Additionally, these nanopreparations can be loaded into their lipidic core with poorly water soluble chemotherapeutic agents, such as paclitaxel or camptothecin. In experiments with cancer cell monolayers, cancer cell 3D spheroids, and in animals with implanted tumors, it was shown that such co-loaded preparations can significantly down-regulate target proteins in cancer cells, enhance drug activity, and reverse multidrug resistance. In order to specifically unload such nanopreparations inside tumors, those can be designed sensitive to local tumor-specific stimuli, such as lowered pH, hypoxia, or overexpressed certain enzymes, such as matrix metalloproteases. Using pH-, hypoxia-, or MMP2-sensitive bonds between different components of nanopreparations co-loaded with siRNA and drugs, one can be able to make the systems specifically delivering biologically active agents in tumors, inside tumor cells, or even to individual cell organelles, which resulted in significantly improved therapeutic response.

  • Advances in Cancer treatment and Biomarkers
    Novel Approaches to Cancer Therapeutics and metabolomics
Location: Melia Meeting 1&2
Speaker

Chair

Colleen Huber

Naturopathic Medical Doctors of Arizona, USA

Speaker

Co-Chair

Paolo Lombardi

Naxospharma srl Cesate, Italy

Speaker
Biography:

Sidath Katugampola completed his PhD in Cambridge. He worked across multiple departments, spanning over 11 years at Pfi zer Research UK. During his last 6 years at Pfi zer Sid, he led projects in Biomarkers and Translational Medicine across multiple therapeutic areas and targets. From the past 3 years of his career, he has been working at the Centre for Drug Development at Cancer Research UK where he is responsible for delivering pharmacodynamic biomarkers, across multiple modalities and cancer types, in early phase oncology clinical trials, the majority of which are fi rst in class agents.

Abstract:

The current process of R&D is not sustainable and there is a big drive for shorter timelines and reduced development costs. In oncology, the number of targeted or immunotherapeutic anti-cancer therapies are on the rise and they are showing signifi cant promise compared to chemotherapy. In early phase oncology clinical development, biomarkers are increasingly being used to identify the right drug for the right patient, at the right dose and schedule in order to clearly demonstrate proof of mechanism and proof of principle. Th is is fundamentally important as oft en in early phase oncology trials, demonstrating proof of concept in terms of effi cacy is very limited and later stage development is performed at risk. With evolving technologies, numerous methods and assays are being explored to demonstrate biological end points that enable successful go/no-go decision for further development and thereby helping to minimize phase II attrition. Surrogate end points, in addition to tumor markers, add more confi dence to overall trial success. Despite this, there are number of limitations and challenges in using biomarkers in early phase oncology trials, including obtaining paired biopsies, successful immune-monitoring, correlation between tumor and surrogate end point and clinical response and making sense of large amounts of data. Despite these challenges, a positive and optimistic outlook prevails in the use of pharmacodynamic and enrichment markers in early phase trials for ultimate patient benefi t.

Speaker
Biography:

Qin shu Shao is a surgery professor, chief physician, and director of Gastrointestinal Surgery of Zhejiang Provinical People’s Hospital. He has published morn than fi fty articles in Important National Journals, 8 articles in SCI. He is a Standing Committee of Zhejiang Provinical Surgery Branch of Chinese Medical Association, a member of the National gastric Professional Committee of Chinese Anti-Cancer Association, a Professional Committee of hepatobiliary and pancreatic tumors surgery of Zhejiang Province, a magazine editorial of “Chinese Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery” and “Chinese Journal of Digestive Surgery”.

Abstract:

This lecture will address a variety of topics related to the use of middle gastrectomy with regional lymph node resection as a new therapeutics in early gastric cancer in the Middle One-third of the Stomach. And will include discussion of: the therapeutics for gastric cancer in recent years; compare the advantage and disadvantage of these therapeutics; compare the diff erence of surgery time, lymph node resection, aerating time, hospitalization time postoperation, feed aft er 3 months and Visick graded index between group A(middle gastrectomy with regional lymph node resection) ,B(total gastrectomy with D1 lymph node resection) and C(endoscopic mucosal resection.). we found that Middle gastrectomy with regional lymph node resection in early gastric cancer will not increase the risk and time of surgery, and it can reduce the risk of lymph node migrating, complication related to surgery, and improve the quality of life.

Speaker
Biography:

Ann Meredith U Garcia completed her MD from the University of the Philippines College of Medicine. She underwent Internal Medicine residency training at the University of the Philippines – Philippine General Hospital and is currently a second-year Medical Oncology fellow-in-training at the same institution. She is also currentlty pursuing Master of Clinical Medicine (Major in Medical Oncology) degree at the University of the Philippines – Manila National Graduate Offi ce for the Health Sciences.

Abstract:

We present the case of a 58-year-old female with a 6-month history of abdominal enlargement. She had previous bowel surgery for an undocumented diagnosis 20 years prior. CT scan showed a pelvic mass. Intraoperatively, the right adnexa was converted into a large, encapsulated, cystic mass with areas of necrosis and hemorrhage. Adherent segments of the ileum and omentum were resected with no masses or gross tumor implants. Histopathologic diagnosis was low-grade fi brosarcoma of the right ovary, with both ileum and omentum positive for tumor. Immunostaining with CD117 (+) and S-100 (-) were done. Subsequent work-up showed hepatic nodules. A diagnosis of gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) was made and imatinib mesylate was started with good clinical response. Preoperative diagnosis of GISTs is uncommon due to its rarity and varied manifestations, more so if it presents as an ovarian mass, an extremely rare event. Routine imaging studies cannot diff erentiate extra-gastrointestinal stromal tumors (eGISTs) from ovarian cancer, so the diagnosis rests on histology and immunohistochemistry. Th e signifi cance of the patient’s previous intestinal pathology in relation to the present tumor cannot be reliably discerned, but the treatment is similar for both recurrent and metastatic cases, whether this is a primary ileal or ovarian GIST. Surgery is the mainstay of treatment and correct postoperative diagnosis is crucial as misdiagnosis carries signifi cant therapeutic and prognostic implications because of the ineff ectiveness of standard chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Th e oral tyrosine kinase inhibitor, imatinib mesylate, has been demonstrated to be an eff ective treatment for both GISTs and eGISTs.

Speaker
Biography:

Adel El-Badrawy is a Professor of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Mansoura University. He is also a Consultant of Interventional Radiology at Oncology center, Mansoura University. He is the Member of the Egyptian Society of Radiology, the Egyptian Society of Interventional Radiology, ESR (European Society of Radiology), ILCA (International Liver Cancer Association) and a Reviewer of European Journal of Radiology, Acta Radiologica, Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal, Egyptian Journal of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine.

Abstract:

Purpose: To review the multi detector CT fi ndings of twenty two cases with synchronous primary solid double malignancies. Material & Methods: Th is retrospective study included twenty-two patients confi rmed with diagnosis of synchronous primary solid double malignancies. Th ey were 12 women and 10 men with age ranging from 52–70 years. CT scanning was performed on one of the two systems (Brilliance 64; Philips) in 14 patients and (Emotion6, Siemens) in 8 patients. All twenty two patients underwent pathological evaluation. Results: Hepato-cellular carcinoma was detected in 11 patients. Non Hodgkin lymphoma was detected in 6 patients. Th yroid carcinoma was detected in 5 patients. Bronchogenic carcinoma was detected in 4 patients. Prostatic and renal carcinomas were detected in 3 patients. Hodgkin lymphoma, endometrial, ovarian and colonic and breast carcinomas were detected in each 2 patients. Uterine cervical carcinoma and cholangiocarcinoma were detected in each one patient. Regional metastatic lymphadenopathy was detected in 5 patients. Haematogenous metastatic was detected in 6 patients. Peritoneal spread was detected in one patient. Conclusion: MDCT scanning is accurately imaging modality for evaluation of synchronous primary solid double malignancies. It has proven to be the superior imaging technique when identifying tumor size, internal architecture, organ of origin, tissue invasion, vascular encasement, calcifi cations and metastases. Clinical application: More reports and accumulation of such cases should help to clarify the mechanisms, contribute to a further understanding of this phenomenon and may lead to a new treatment strategy for synchronous primary solid double malignancies.

Vladimir P Torchilin

Center for Translational Cancer Nanomedicine, USA

Title: Work shop: Nanomedcine for Cancer

Time : 14:05-16:20

Speaker
Biography:

Vladimir Torchilin is University Distinguished Professor and Director, Center for Pharmaceutical Biotechnology and Nanomedicine, Northeastern University, Boston.He has published more than 350 original papers, more than 150 reviews and book chapters, wrote and edited 10 books and holds more than 40 patents. He is Editor-in-Chief of Current Drug Discovery Technologies and of Drug Delivery. He is a Member of European Academy of Sciences, Fellow of AIMBE, AAPS and CRS, and received many important national and international awards including the 2013 Blaise Pascal Medal in Biomedicine from EAS. In 2005, he was a President of the CRS and in 2011 Times Higher Education ranked him number 2 among top world scientists in pharmacology for 2001-2010.

Abstract:

Rapid development of biomedical nanotechnology holds great promise to modify and improve various diagnostic and therapeutic strategies against cancer. Nanomedicine products make it possible to achieve highly specifi c tumor targeting and provide multifunctionality both, in terms of their loading with diff erent drugs and diagnostic markers and in terms of their responsiveness to local tumor-specifi c stimuli. Th ey can signifi cantly improve properties and effi cacy of various conventional therapeutics and bring to life a new generation of anti-cancer agents.

Speaker
Biography:

Abstract:

Hepato-cellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the world’s deadliest cancers and eff orts to improve its therapy have not yet impacted its poor prognosis and high associated mortality. Limited therapeutic effi cacy, high rate of resistance and signifi cant toxicity of current HCC conventional therapy constitutes the most important challenge. In turn, development of more eff ective and highly selective alternative new therapeutic approach is a critical medical need. Interestingly, application of cancer targeting gene-virotherapy (CTGVT), in which an anti-tumor gene is inserted into an oncolytic viral vector, has shown much better anti-tumor activity than that of respective gene therapy alone or oncolytic virus (e.g. oncolytic adenovirus, OAd) therapy alone. More importantly, further modifi cation of this strategy to a novel one called the cancer-targeting dual gene viro-therapy (CTDGVT), in which an excellent triplex anticancer eff ect can be achieved by the oncolytic eff ect of AOd and the additive or synergetic interaction between two anti-tumor genes encoded by this vector. Th erefore, the present research work was designed to investigate the therapeutic potential and possible synergy of this CTDGVT strategy in treatment of HCC. As the remarkable tumoricidal eff ects of ING4 gene; a new member of tumor suppressor genes, and TRAIL gene; an apoptotic ligand induces apoptosis in tumor cells, have been recently documented, herein we investigated the therapeutic effi cacy of CTDGVT strategy composed of co-administration of OAd-ING4 plus OAd-TRAIL. To achieve these objectives, we fi rstly constructed and generated the followings 3 OAds: OAd alone (i.e., not carrying any therapeutic gene), OAd- expressing ING4 gene, and OAd- expressing TRAIL gene. Next, the tumoricidal eff ect of OAd alone, OAd-ING4, OAd-TRAIL, and OAd-ING4 plus OAd-TRAIL were tested and evaluated both in vitro and in vivo, using universal human HCC cell lines and xenograft mouse model of human HCC. Results showed that each tested strategy (OAd alone, OAd- ING4, OAd-TRAIL and OAd-ING4 plus OAd-TRAIL) had resulted in signifi cant cytotoxic and inhibitory eff ects on both human cell lines and xenograft model of HCC; however, the highest effi cient eff ect was achieved by OAd-ING4 plus OAd-TRAIL combination therapy, and this advantage of CTDGVT strategy was confi rmed by the gross, histopathological, immunohistochemical, ELISA and qRT-PCR fi ndings. Th e present new preclinical data of HCC-targeting CTDGVT strategy, which composed of OAd carrying ING4 and TRAIL tumor-suppressor genes, may provide a promising approach for liver cancer gene therapy.

Speaker
Biography:

Esam Omar graduated from University of London after a residency program at UCL Hospitals and Eastman Dental Institute, London, UK, with Master Degree and Fellowship of Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland FFDRCSI in 2005. He is a fellow of International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and Senior Fellow of Head and Neck Optical Diagnostic Society. University College London, London. UK. From Dec. 2006 to July 2008 he was Assistant Professor of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery in King Khalid University (KKU) and the head of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery Department and Biomedical Dental Sciences Department and Director of Dental Hospital at KKU. In July 2008 Dr. Omar moved to Taibah University and he is still holding a position of Assistant Professor and member of Department Committee.

Abstract:

Background: Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) has a remarkably high incidence worldwide, and a fairly serious prognosis, encouraging further research into advanced technologies for noninvasive methods of making early diagnoses, ideally in primary care settings. Objective: Our purpose was to examine the validity of using salivary markers changes in OSCC,s patients by advanced nanotechnology and molecular diagnostics for diagnosing OSCC by identifying and evaluating relevant published reports. Methods: MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CINAHL were searched to identify clinical trials and other information published between 1990 and 10 June 2014; the searches of MEDLINE and EMBASE were updated to November 2014. Studies of noninvasive methods of diagnosing OSCC (saliva-based diagnosis and others were included). Data were abstracted and evaluated in duplicate for possible relevance on two occasions at an interval of 2 months before being included or excluded. Studies met the inclusion criteria and have been assessed by modifi ed version of the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies instrument. Findings: 42 studies of saliva based oral diagnosis met the inclusion criteria. Salivary diagnostics is a dynamic and emerging fi eld utilizing nanotechnology and molecular diagnostics that can be helpful in diagnosis of OSCC. Conclusions: It is clear that screening for and early detection of cancer and pre-cancerous lesions have the potential to reduce the morbidity and mortality of this disease. Advances in nanotechnology for saliva-based oral diagnosis are a promising pathway for the future development of more eff ective noninvasive methods for diagnosing OSCC that are easy to perform clinically in primary care settings. Key words: Oral cancer, noninvasive methods, saliva based diagnostics

Speaker
Biography:

Abstract:

The type I interferons (IFNs) including IFN-alphas and IFN-beta are innate cytokines that directly or indirectly regulates antiviral defense. Activation of pattern recognition receptor (PRR) by viral pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) such as nucleic acids leads to massive production of IFN-alpha/beta, which confers cells with antiviral state in an IFNAR (IFN-alpha/betareceptor)- dependent manner. As well as eliciting strong antiviral activities, these cytokines are also known to show antitumor eff ect and immuno-modulating eff ect. In this study, we tried to harness cytoplasmic RNA-mediated activation of IFN pathway to directly suppress tumor growth. We fi rst found that among various cancer cell lines tested, human breast cancer MCF-7 cells robustly induced IFN-beta production in response to stimulation with 5’-triphosphate RNA and poly(rI:rC), both of which are synthetic ligands for cytoplasmic RNA sensors such as RIG-I and MDA5, respectively. In addition, MCF-7 cells were found to undergo signifi cant cell death in response to stimulation with these RLR ligands. Th is tumor cell death was suppressed by blockade of type I IFN signaling with anti-IFNAR-2 antibodies, suggesting that the RLR-ligand-induced cell death is dependent at least in part on type I IFN receptormediated signaling. Interestingly, in the absence of RLR ligand stimulation, IFN-beta treatment alone failed to remarkably induce tumor cell death. Consistent with this result, in vivo tumor growth of MCF-7 in nude mice was suppressed by treatment with RLR ligands but not IFN-beta. Th us, our present data suggest that the RLR-mediated signaling is essential to achieve the IFN-dependent cell death of MCF-7, and may provide a new insight into innate signaling-assisted cancer therapy.