Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 5th World Congress on Cancer Therapy Atlanta, Georgia, USA.

Day 2 :

  • Anti Cancer Drugs & Delivery
    Novel Approaches to Cancer Therapeutics
    Cancer Therapy Clinical Cancer Research
    Cancer & Lifestyle Connection
    Complementary & Alternative Medicine (CAM)
    Cancer Biomarkers
    Cancer Nanotechnology
Speaker

Chair

Yoshiaki Omura

New York Medical College, USA

Speaker

Co-Chair

Sherri Z. Millis

Advanced Individual Medicine, USA

Session Introduction

Steven Chamow

Chamow & Associates Inc., USA

Title: Molecular engineering of Fc fusion proteins to tailor effector function to clinical indication

Time : 08:30-08:50

Biography:

Steven Chamow, PhD., has 28 years of experience in biopharmaceutical product development. He is currently principal consultant at Chamow & Associates, Inc., working with biotechnology companies to design and implement development strategies for new therapeutic products. During his career, he served in roles of increasing responsibility at Genentech, Scios, Abgenix, Genitope and Intradigm and has contributed to the development of three marketed products (Avastin, Natrecor, Vectibix). Chamow was educated at the University of California (UC Santa Cruz, B.A. in biology; UC Davis, PhD. in biochemistry), and completed postdoctoral training at the National Institutes of Health. He is author or co-author of more than 50 scientifi c publications and patents and serves on the editorial board of the journal mAbs. Chamow recently completed his second book (Therapeutic Fc-Fusion Proteins) published by Wiley-Blackwell and released in 2014.

Abstract:

The potential therapeutic value of many proteins—including enzymes, receptors, cytokines and peptides—can be realized by fusing these proteins to the Fc region of human immunoglobulin G. Eff ector functions mediated by Fc can signifi cantly alter the biological activity of Fc fusion proteins. Th ese functions include antibody dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC), which occurs through binding of the Fc domain to Fc receptors (FcR) on immune cells, as well as complementmediated cytotoxicity (CDC), induced by binding to C1q. Notably, Fc eff ector functions can be modulated through choice of Fc subclass, mutagenesis, and modifi cation of oligosaccharides. Th e use of Fc engineering to tailor eff ector function to clinical indication in this drug class will be discussed.

Raffaella Sordella

Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, USA

Title: Cancer cell- state plasticity and resistance to therapy

Time : 08:50-09:10

Biography:

Raffaella Sordella after completing her PhD studies at Turin Univeersity did her postdoctoral training at Massachusetts general hospital and Harvard medical school. Currently she is an associate Professor at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory.

Abstract:

Therapeutic resistance has been proven to be one of the foremost obstacles limiting the clinical effi cacy of cancer drug treatments including targeted therapies for non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) harboring activating EGFR mutations. Recent evidence indicated that the intrinsic heterogeneity of tumors is one of the main mechanisms of acquired drug resistance. Here we show that NSCLC harboring EGFR mutations can become resistant to inhibition of EGFR via a novel epigenetic mechanism. By modeling erlotinib resistance, we identifi ed a drug-tolerant cell population that is already present in NSCLC populations prior to drug treatment. Th ese erlotinib-resistant cells are regulated epigenetically and represent an alternative cell state in which cancer cells can reside in. Th e transition between these diff erent cell states modifi es the cell signaling network, reworks cancer cell dependency and induces a hypermutable phenotype. Th ese fi ndings provide a rationale for incorporating novel fi rst-line combination therapies in the treatment of NSCLC harboring EGFR-activating mutations.

Biography:

Zhi-Ren Liu has done his Ph.D in Biochemistry in Florida State University in the year 1994

Abstract:

Due to abnormal expression of integrins αv3 in various disease conditions, this integrin pair has been a focus as targets for drug development. Studies yield a few successful examples. Among them are various antibodies against the integrins, and most recently, Cilengitide, a RGD-based peptidomimetic.Nevertheless, most of current approaches focus on ligand-binding with goal of inhibition of integrin functions.A major draw-back of targeting ligand-binding of integrins is activation of integrin signaling by the developed agent, which largely limit the clinical success of the integrin ligand based antagonist/agonist. We report here development of a new class of therapeutically protein agent (Ref to as ProAgio) by rational protein design using a stable host protein. ProAgio is designed to target integrins αv3 at a novel site. ProAgio exhibits a strong in vitro activity in induction of apoptosis of integrin αv3 expressing cells. ProAgio induces apoptosis by recruiting and activating caspase 8 to the cytoplasmic domain of the targeted integrins. Tests with tumor xenograft s show that ProAgio strongly inhibits tumor growth. Histology analyses indicate that tumor vessels are reduced, while the established vasculatures are not aff ected. Th e results confi rm targeting of integrin αv3 as an anti-angiogenic agent. Toxicity analyses demonstrate that ProAgio is not toxic to mouse at very high doses. Our study develops an eff ective integrin targeting agent via a novel mechanism of action. Our approach provides a new platform for development of therapeutics by targeting integrins.

Biography:

Eskouhie Tchaparian is currently director of translational and clinical research at HolyStone Healthcare Inc. (HSHC). She has more than 15 years experience of academic and biotechnology research both in preclinical and clinical areas. Prior to joining HSHC, Tchaparian was a researcher at Bioengineering and Therapeutic Sciences department, University of California, San Francisco, and worked at Amgen where she held positions of increasing responsibility in multidisciplinary research activities. She has authored or co-authored over 40 research papers, abstracts, or book chapters. Tchaparian received her Master’s and PhD. in Nutritional Biology/physiology and metabolism from University of California, Davis.

Abstract:

This talk will address recent trends in targeted anticancer drug delivery systems with a focus on Hyaluronic Acid (HA) drug conjugate, a linear polysaccharide, for selective and targeted transport of anticancer therapeutics. It will also discuss the advantages of using this approach to deliver drugs at desired locations. Concept, design, and applications will be emphasized. A specifi c example CA102N, a Nimuselide (COX2 inhibitor) derivative (HA) conjugate, will be presented. CA102N is currently in preclinical development as a new anticancer agent against colorectal cancer. Th e antitumor activity, in vitro (cell based) and in vivo (xenograft s mice), of CA102N will be communicated. In addition, some hightlights on the potential of its mechanism of action (MOA) will be elucidated. A brief description of the preclinical safety of CA102N and the overall safety profi le of HA drug conjugates will be evaluated as well.

Biography:

Introduction: Current therapy for PDAC is surgery followed by adjuvant chemotherapy for early-stage and palliative chemotherapy for advanced disease. Gemcitabine is the standard drug in both adjuvant and palliative treatment. Th e mixture of Alkaloids (NSC-631570) in combination with gemcitabine signifi cantly increased the median survival of advanced PDAC patients with respect to gemcitabine alone (10.4 vs 5.2 months; p<0.001). Furthermore, preclinical studies showed that this mixture had selective citotoxic eff ects in cancer cell lines derived from diff erent tumor types, but not in normal cell lines. Aim: To evaluate the citotoxic eff ects of NSC-631570 in 2 Primary Pancreatic Cancer Cell Lines (PPTCCs), fi broblasts derived from PDAC specimens (F-PDAC) and an immortalized epithelial ductal pancreatic cell line (HNPE). Materials & Methods: Cytotoxicity was assessed by the CellTiter 96 kit (Promega) based on the cellular metabolism of the tetrazolium compound XTT, which is reduced by living cells to yield a soluble formazan product in the presence of the electron coupling agent phenazine methosulfate, while the modulation of Ukrain uptake in the medium was studied using the fl uorescence property of NSC-631570 with the AlphaDigiDoc soft ware by UV light excitation (ULA-DC test). Results: Citotoxic eff ects of Ukrain in PPTCCs were signifi cantly higher than those observed in F-PDAC and HPNE cells (20% vs. 80% alive cells, at 10 μM [drug]). Furthermore, the ULA-DC test revealed that PPTCCs cells consumed more drug than F-PDAC and HPNE cells (paired Student’s test, n=4, p<0.001). Conclusion: Th ese data demonstrated the selective eff ect of NSC-631570 in PPTCCs, which may be related to a diff erent transport system or higher metabolism of the drug in PDAC. Indeed, the two diff erents up-take of alkaloids discovered in cancer and non cancer pancreatic cells seem to suggest an higher expression of multi drug resistant systems (MDR) in F-PDAC and HPNE cells and warrant further investigations in order to support the possible role of Ukrain in PDAC treatment.

Abstract:

Niccola Funel received his fi rst graduation in Bio-Molecular Science (2000) from Pisa University, Italy, where he acquired both PhD graduation in “Experimental and Molecular Oncology” (2006) and Specialization in “Clinical Pathology” (2008). Since 2002 he have been working in Surgical Pathology division (Department of Surgery, University of Pisa) where he involved in different projects focused on Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma (PDAC). In 2010 he become PI of his project regarding “News therapeutic strategies against PDAC”. In 2011 he became council member of Italian Society for Pancreas Study (AISP) for three years. He is also EPC member (European Pancreatic Club) and PC member (Pancreatic Club) since 2009. He awarded six time from AISP at the annual meeting as “ young investigator”. He received a grant as “Young Investigator 2013” from “Fondazione Veronesi”, Milan, Italy. Dr. Funel is author and co-author of 60 papers, more than 130 abstracts presented at national, International and world-wide congresses. Field of expertize: PDAC, Oncology, Biomarkers, TMA, Laser Microdissection and Primary Cell Cultures.

Burkhard Kloesch

Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Rheumatology, Austria

Title: A persulfide analog of the nitrosothiol SNAP, D-P*, induces apoptotic cell death in Jurkat leukemia T-cells

Time : 10:10-10:30

Biography:

Burkhard Kloesch has completed his PhD at the age of 31 years from Karl-Franzens University Graz and postdoctoral studies from General Hospital Graz, Austria and Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Experimental and Clinical Traumatology in Vienna, Austria. He is the director of the Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Rheumatology. He has published more than 10 papers in reputed journals and is a member of the Austrian Society of Rheumatology (OEGR).

Abstract:

Background/Aim: Many studies have reported about the controversial role of hydrogen sulfi de (H2S) in cell survival, proliferation and apoptosis. In the present work, two H2S-releasing compounds, sodium hydrogen sulfi de (NaHS) and D-P*, a novel persulfi de analog of the nitrosothiol S-nitroso-N-acetyl-D,L-penicillamine, were selected for evaluation of their antiproliferative and pro-apoptotic potential in Jurkat leukemia T-cells. Materials and Methods: Jurkat leukemia T-cells were stimulated with phorbol 12-myristate 13- acetate and the calcium ionophore A23187 in the absence or presence of diff erent concentrations of NaHS or D-P* (0.125 – 1 mM). Interleukin-2 (IL- 2) production was analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Proliferation and cell viability were monitored by 2,3-bis- (2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide assay, annexin-V/7-amino-actinomycin D staining and western blot. Results: Both H2S donors eff ectively blocked IL-2 synthesis in Jurkat T-cells. In contrast to NaHS, D-P* dramatically reduced proliferation and cell viability of Jurkat T-cells. D-P* induced cleavage of caspase-3/-7, poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase, myeloid cell leukemia-1 and β-catenin. High concentrations of the anti-oxidant N-acetyl-cysteine could completely block programmed cell death. Conclusion: In contrast to the “classic” H2S donor NaHS, the novel and slow-releasing H2S donor D-P* showed potent antiproliferative and pro-apoptotic activities in Jurkat leukemia T-cells suggesting that D-P* led to an imbalance in the redox system (GSH depletion?) which in turn induced apoptosis.

Break: Coffee Break 10:30 - 10:45 @ Foyer

Paul Bremond

Aix-Marseille University, France

Title: Alkoxyamines for the in-situ generation of radicals as theranostic agents

Time : 10:45-11:05

Biography:

Paul Bremond has completed his PhD in chemistry in France, where he developed syntheses of several natural products. After being a postdoctoral associate at Harvard University, Cambridge, Ma, USA under the supervision of Prof. Yoshito Kishi, he was appointed Assistant Professor in Aix-Marseille Université. So far he has published more than 35 peer-reviewed papers in several fi elds of chemistry: organic, physical, radical and medicinal and one patent. He now focus on the synthesis of new alkoxyamines as theranostics agents.

Abstract:

Alkoxyamines R1R2NOR3 are able to undergo homolysis upon chemical activation to release a stable nitroxide R1R2NO•, which can be used for DNP-MRI, and a transient alkyl radical R3•, which can be used for killing tumor cells. By combining diagnostic and therapeutic activities into a single low-molecular weight molecule, alkoxyamines are new theranostic tools. We have developed this concept recently, and proved that they are reliable and controllable sources of in-situ generated radicals able to exhibit interesting biological and imaging properties.

Biography:

Raul A. Ruggiero is PhD in Biological Science from the National University of Buenos Aires, Argentina. He is the director of the Laboratory of Experimental Oncology, National Academy of Medicine of Buenos Aires. He has published more than 40 scientifi c papers in reputed journals and books in the area of Experimental and Theoretical Oncology.

Abstract:

Concomitant resistance (CR) is a phenomenon in which tumor-bearing hosts inhibit the growth of secondary tumor implants. Its relevance to the control of metastases is highlighted by the fact that the removal of tumors is sometimes followed by abrupt metastatic growth, suggesting that a primary tumor may exert a controlling action on its metastases, which can be considered natural secondary tumor implants. CR induced by both immunogenic and non-immunogenic tumors had been associated with an anti-tumor serum factor that remained elusive for many years. Recently, we identifi ed that factor(s) as a mixture of meta- and ortho-tyrosine, two unnatural isomers of tyrosine, as responsible for 90% and 10% of the total serum anti-tumor activity, respectively. Th e antitumor eff ects of these tyrosine isomers were mediated in part by the early inhibition of the MAP/ERK pathway and inactivation of STAT3, potentially driving tumor cells to dormancy in G0-phase. Additionally, the activation of a putative intra–S-phase checkpoint would accumulate tumor cells in S-phase. Periodic intravenous administration of meta-tyrosine dramatically reduced lung and hepatic spontaneous metastases in mice bearing three diff erent murine tumors, and decreased death rates from 100 up to 25% in tumor-excised mice with established metastases at the time of surgery. Th ese eff ects were achieved even at very low concentrations and without displaying any detectable toxic side eff ects. Results suggest that the use of meta-tyrosine may help to develop new and less harmful means of managing malignant diseases, especially those aimed to control metastatic growth, an issue of pivotal clinical importance.

Biography:

Yarim has completed his PhD from Hacettepe University and postdoctoral studies from ETH-Zürich. Professor Yarim has studied anticancer drug design and she has authored several peer-reviewed reports. She has served on numerous review committees for the National Science Foundation in Turkey. She has served on the editorial boards for the Pharmacologia. She is a member of the QSAR Society.

Abstract:

This lecture will cover synthesis, characterization and cytotoxic activities of some new benzothiazole-piperazine derivatives. Structures of compounds N-(substituted-1,3-benzothiazol-2-yl)-2-(4-substituted-piperazin-1-yl)acetamide derivatives were clarifi ed with IR, 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR, mass spectroscopies and elemental analyses. In vitro cytotoxic activities of compounds were screened against hepatocellular (HUH-7), breast (MCF-7) and colorectal (HCT-116) cancer cell lines by sulphorhodamine B assay. Based on the GI50 values of the compounds, most of the benzothiazole-piperazine derivatives are active against HUH-7, MCF-7 and HCT-116 cancer cell lines. In addition, further investigation of compounds by Hoechst staining and FACS revealed that these compounds cause apoptosis by cell cycle arrest at subG1 phase. On the basis of their high potency in cellular environment, these straightforward benzothiazole-piperazine derivatives may possess potential in the design of more potent compounds for intervention with cancer cell proliferation.

Yuguo Yu

Jiangsu Andeson Biomedical Inc., China

Title: Anti-tumor activity of Wei-Shen: Pre- Clinical and clinical studies

Time : 11:45-12:05

Biography:

Dr. Guo is originally from Taiwan and received his Ph. D. from the University of Iowa. Before coming to Buffalo, he completed his postdoctoral work at Montclair State University. He is currently an assistant professor in the Department of communicative Disorders and Sciences at the University at Buffalo. He teaches child language development and child language disorders in the department. Dr. Guo’s research focuses on syntactic development in typical and atypical populations, such as children with specific language impairment and children with cochlear implants. He is also interested in how the lexical and grammatical measures derived from language samples can help clinicians identify children with language impairment at a young age.

Abstract:

Background: Gastric cancer (GC) is the second leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. China accounts for over 40% of all new GC cases in the world. Currently the overall 5 year relative survival rate of GC remains poor. New approaches to treat gastric cancer are needed. Wei-shen, a complex prescription based on the theory of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), has shown signifi cant effi cacy on GC patients in private practices. In this report, the anti-tumor activity of Wei-Shen was evaluated in both pre-clinical and clinical studies. Methods: A prospective, open label observational study was conducted to investigate the eff ectiveness of Wei-Shen on gastric cancer patients. Th e drug was administered in capsules containing 3g raw powder of Wei-Shen BID for 3 to 6 months. Th e cytotoxicity study was conducted using a serial of dilutions of ethanol extract of Wei-Shen powder on the cultured KATO III gastric, HT29 and HCT15 colorectal and PC-9 lung cancer cells. Results: Total of 38 GC patients were enrolled in the study and treated with Wei-Shen for 3 to 6 months. Among them, complete remission was achieved in 30 patients, whose tumors disappeared in biopsy tests. Some GC patients have disease free survival for over 10 years aft er being treated Wei-Shen for 3 to 21 months. Th e treatment of 95% ethanol extract of Wei-Shen for 24-96 hr had dose-dependent anti proliferative or killing eff ects on cultured KATO III gastric cancer cells. Th e Wei-Shen extract had similar anticancer eff ects on HT29 and HCT15 colorectal, and PC9 lung cancer cells. Conclusion: Traditional Chinese Medicine holds great potential to improve people’s health and wellness. Wei-Shen demonstrated potent effi cacy in gastric cancer patients and complete remission was achieved in subset of patients. Wei-Shen has dramatic cytotoxicity on highly malignant gastric cancer, colorectal and lung cancer cell lines. Further research is needed to elucidate the mechanisms of Wei-Shen’s anti-cancer eff ect. Th e effi cacy and safety of Wei-Shen need to be further investigated in large-scale, placebo-controlled clinical trials.

Biography:

Hung-Wei Yang received his M.S. and PhD. degrees in Chemical and Materials Engineering from Chang Gung University, in 2006 and 2011. After receiving the PhD. degree, he was a postdoctoral researcher in Chemical Engineering at National Tsing Hua University, Taiwan; and in Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, USA. He is currently an assistant Professor in the Institute of Medical Science and Technology at National Sun Yat-sen University, Taiwan, from 2014. His current research includes studies of biomaterials synthesis for targeted drug/gene delivery, design/fabrication of biosensors, microneedle patches for hypodermic drug delivery/vaccination, and virus-like particles preparation as vaccine/small molecular drug/RNAi carriers.

Abstract:

Malignant brain tumors are central nervous system tumors that are almost always fatal. Patients treated by surgical resection, radiotherapy and chemotherapy survive, on average, for 6-24 months post-treatment. To date, surgery still is the primary treatment for brain tumor, following by chemotherapy is necessary to prevent the tumor recurrence. However, the passage of many potentially eff ective diagnostic or therapeutic agents from the circulating blood fl ow into brain tissues is limited by blood-brain barrier (BBB), resulting in the failure of chemotherapy. Th us, the treatment of various diseases by drug delivery to the brain is a particular challenge. To overcome the problems, we report the design, synthesis, and evaluation of a targeted delivery system consisting of gold nanorods-incorporated mesoporous magnetic nanoparticles encoding with Apolipoprotein E-derived Peptide to enhance the penetration of BBB for targeted drug delivery and near-infrared photothermal therapy. Our preliminary data showed that the high aspect ratio gold nanorods were successfully conjugated on the surface of mesoporous magnetic nanoparticles and the saturated magnetization could be high to 68.5 emu/g. Th is delivery system could potentially allow safe delivery of other potent and toxic drugs into brain tumor tissues by crossing the BBB and provide dual-treatment for overcoming the biological complexity, and therapeutic challenges of some tumors which are currently considered diffi cult to treat.

Biography:

Yeu Su has completed his PhD. from University of Wisconsin-Madison and postdoctoral studies from the Oncology Center of Johns Hopkins University in 1991 and 1993, respectively. He is currently a full professor of the Institute of Biopharmaceutical Sciences of National Yang-Ming University, a premier Medical University in Taiwan. He has published more than 50 papers in reputed journals such as Oncogen and Stem Cells, and has been serving as an editorial board member of the World Journal of Biological Chemistry

Abstract:

STAT3 activation has been shown to be associated with enhanced malignancy and metastasis in human colorectal cancer (CRC). Moreover, active STAT3 was reported to be critical for the proliferation and survival of human colorectal cancer stem cells (CRSCs). Accordingly, several STAT3 inhibitors have been shown to block both the viability and self-renewal of CRSCs. Th erefore, novel agents capable of reducing the levels of active STAT3 may help in treating CRC more eff ectively. Because STAT3 is activated mainly by the phosphorylation of its tyrosine 705, a dephos-phorylation of this phosphorresidue executed primarily by the SH2 domain-containing phosphatase 1 (SHP-1), results in its inactivation. In this study, we assessed whether three novel SHP-1 activators including Sorafenib, SC-43, and SC-2001 could suppress the stemness of HCT-116 and HT-29 human CRC cells. Even though all three SHP-1 activators not only inhibited sphere formation but also induced sphere shrinkage of both cell lines, SC-2001 was excluded due to its low potency. Subsequently, Sorafenib and SC-43 were shown to suppress the anchorage-independent growth in both CRC lines. Furthermore, two agents could inhibit the expression of several CRSC markers as well as reduce the CD133+/CD44+ subpopulations in these cells. Interestingly, SC-43 was much more potent than Sorafenib in reducing the stemness properties of two CRC lines which could be accounted by its higher effi cacy in reducing their active STAT3 levels. Since the dosages of both Sorafenib and SC-43 required for suppressing the stemness were signifi cantly lower than those for diminishing the active STAT3 levels, investigation of the possible involvement of some “off -target” eff ects in their CRSC-suppressive activities is currently underway.

Biography:

Tamás Vancsik graduated at the age of 24 years from Eötvös Loránd University in 2014. He is currently a PhD student at the 1st Department of Pathology and Experimental Cancer Research, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary.

Abstract:

Modulated electro-hyperthermia (mEHT; tradename: oncothermia) is used as a complementary to radio- and chemotherapy. Th e electric fi eld and concomitant heat of <42oC can accumulate in malignancies due to their elevated glycolysis (Warburg eff ect) and conductivity. Previously we showed that mEHT provoke programmed cell death and infi ltration of immune cells in colorectal carcinoma xenograft s of immunocompromised mice. Here we tested if the local antitumor eff ect of mEHT aff ects a distant tumor (abscopal eff ect) using immunocompetent animals. C26 colorectal carcinoma allograft s were implanted into both femoral regions of BalbC mice. A single shot mEHT for 30 minutes was applied on the right side tumor either without or with intraperitoneal injection of a cytotoxic T cell promoting agent. Histomorphologic, immunohistochemical and TUNEL assay results were gained 12, 24, 48 and 72 hours post-treatment. mEHT caused progressive tumor cell damage compared to controls and showed elevated number of activated caspase-3, caspase-8 and TUNEL positive cells, accompanied with cytoplasmic release of chytochrome-c, but without changes in apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF), or BAX patterns. Stressassociated release of HMGB1 protein and increased numbers of CD3 positive T cells were also observed. Besides similar decay in the treated tumor, a prominent anti-tumor response was also observed in the untreated left -side tumors in animals inoculated with the fl avonoid-rich agent. In our model mEHT caused tumor destruction dominantly via caspase-dependent programmed cell death both in the treated tumors and in the untreated distant tumors when combined with a T-cell promoting agent, where the release of stress associated HMGB1 may support anti-tumor immunity.

Break: Lunch Break 13:05- 13:35 @ Restaurant

Dongqi Tang

The Second Hospital of Shandong University, China

Title: Profiling cancer gene mutations in non-small cell lung cancer by droplet digital PCR

Time : 13:35-13:55

Biography:

Dongqi Tang has completed his PhD from Peking University and postdoctoral studies from the University of Florida. He is the director of Animal Experiment Center of The Second Hospital of Shandong University. He has published papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an editorial board member of repute.

Abstract:

As a noninvasive liquid biopsy, plasma cell-free DNA (cfDNA) was studied as a potentially valuable surrogate specimen for detecting tumor-specifi c aberrations. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the common type of lung cancer, which is the leading cause of cancer death throughout the world. Most patients were diagnosed too late for curative treatment. So, it is necessary to develop a minimal invasive method to identify NSCLC at an early stage. Here, we studied cfDNA collected from subjects with advanced NSCLC by performing droplet digital PCR on serial cfDNA specimens collected from patients and healthy control. Our fi ndings demonstrated that the ctDNA could serve as a viable tool to monitor NSCLC and prompted us to find more sensitive and specifi c biomarkers for clinical practice, especially monitor these cases with at least one known gene abnormality.

Biography:

Gvozdenovic Ljiljana and Aleksandar Milovancev, Clinical Center of Vojvodina, Serbia

Abstract:

Introduction: Aristotle wrote, “Th e aim of the wise is not to secure pleasure, but to avoid pain”. Despite signifi cant medical, pharmacological and technological advances in the area of cancer pain assessment and management, up to 90% of patients with advanced cancer experience pain signifi cant enough to require further intervention. Hospices are considered as leaders in cancer pain management. Methods: Th e Edmonton Classifi cation System for Cancer Pain (ECS-CP) is an instrument developed with the primary aim to predict response to treatment in patients with advanced cancer. It has gone through several stepwise and systematicvalidation studies, although its clinical application is still limited. In the fi rst version of the ECS-CP (1989), named the Edmonton Staging System for Cancer Pain (ESS), patients with advanced diseases were categorized into three groups with good, intermediate or poor prognosis for pain treatment. Th is depended on their scores on seven domains: mechanism of pain, incident pain, previous narcotic exposure, cognitive function, psychological distress, opioid tolerance and history of drug or alcohol abuse. Results: According to a large European study from 2008, in which Serbia participated, it is reported that pain was not adequately treated in 36% to 82.3% of patients. Cause of cancer related pain is most oft en related to the growth of the tumor, metastases, or pressure onto surrounding nerves, as well as to iatrogenic consequences of neurotoxic drugs. In 70-90% of patients in our country, cancer pain was treated with pharmacotherapy based on a triple therapy regimen defi ned by WHO. Discussion: Treatment of cancer related pain should follow a multimodal approach. Concept of total pain (physical, psychological, social and emotional aspects of the patient) needs to be respected. Evaluation of pain intensity is necessary before choosing therapy. Th is can be achieved with the use of pain classifi cation scales such as the Edmonton Classifi cation System for Cancer Pain (ECS-CP). Conclusion: In certain number of patients even intensive pharmacotherapy cannot provide adequate pain management, demanding non-pharmacologic methods of treatment. Th erefore, optimal pain management and development of standardized methods of cancer pain assessment is of utmost importance.

H. Seda Vatansever

Celal Bayar University, Turkey

Title: Nanotubes and their functions in cancer

Time : 14:15-14:35

Biography:

Prof. Dr. Seda Vatansever has completed her PhD at the age of 31 years from Liverpool University and all academic studies from Celal Bayar University School of Medicine. She has published more than 80 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an editorial board member of repute. She interest in cancer cell biology, apoptosis, stem cell (both embryonic and mesenchymal) culture and differentiation, oocyte culture.

Abstract:

Since Rustom et al have shown formation of tunneling nanotubes (TNT) and published in Science journal in 2004 afterward this topic became crucial in forms of intercellular communication. Th ese formations have been called as tunneling nanotubes because of their diameter is around 50-200 nm and these nanotubes may easily move throug extracellular matrix to reach and communicate with other cells. TNTs are formated by F-Aktin polymerization in small tubes. On the other hand, in bigger tubes microtubul association has been observed during polymerization of F-Aktin. In time, there are some papers about tunneling nanotubes which have been published about normal and cancer cells. Especially, Ohno et al have shown that M-Sec is a central player of TNTs in Nature Cell Biology journal. Th is study presents that M-Sec protein also helps to formate protrusions of membrane as a marker of TNT. We hypothesize that M-Sec protein, central player of TNT formation, is overexpressed in these cancer cells which have overexpression of RalA. In this study, we aim to investigate roles, importance and diff erence of TNTs in primary and metastatic cancer cell lines. After WGA staining, there was TNT in metastatic colon (Colo-741) and breast (M4A4) cell lines. Nanotubes tunnelings were observed both the neighboring and cell colonies of metastatic colon and breast cancer cell lines have been identified. While RalA, RalB, RalAA/B and connexin-43 immunoreactivity were similar in both primer and metastatic colon and breast cancer cells, M-sec staining of colo-741 was found to be higher in the metastatic cell line. The results of Western blot analysis did M4A4 M-Sec in the metastatic group were also found to be higher than the Colo-741. Nanotubes tunnelings were observed especially in metastatic cancer cell lines (Colo-741, M4A4), and their presence in metastatic cell may be important for to propagation and survival of the cells can be achieved by the presence of TNTs and new approaches in the patient samples for treatment by testing the presence of TNT was concluded.

Biography:

Ekta Rawat is currently pursuingher PhD. in Bio-inorganic and SupramolecularChemistry at Kurukshetra University, India. She has been awarded with Young Scientist Award and Best Paper Presentation award at National conferences organised by reputed Universities of India. She has co-authored seven papers in Journals of International repute and one book chapter. She has presented papers in various International and domestic conferences. She has been awarded with the Fellowship by University Grants Commission; India in 2013. Moreover, she is also working on Major Research Project funded by UGC, Indiaon organometallic compounds in cancer therapy.She is also a life member of Indian Science Congress Association, Kolkata, India. One of her paper has been selected in 3rd Annual International Conference on Chemistry 2015 at Athens, Greece.Herresearch interests involve the development of some important biologically active metal based drugs.

Abstract:

Despite many efforts, cancer is among the top three causes of death in modern society, demanding improved treatments, that currently includes surgery, chemotherapy, and various types of radiation therapy. Inorganic medicinal chemistry has been dominated by the study of the anti-cancer properties of macrocyclic metal complexes. Th ere are a compelling number of drug targets where macrocycles have the potential to bind with good affinity. Metallomacrocycles is an outstanding tool for making structurally matching complexes with drastically diff erent anticancer potentials. Macroyclic complexes possess a number of advantages that render them as attractive alternatives to organic small molecules for the development of therapeutic agents. In this perspective, we highlight recent advances in medicinal inorganic chemistry pertaining to the use of macrocyclic ligands for enhanced antimicrobial and anticancer activity. A novel series of macrocyclic complexes of Tin(II) have been derived from dicarboxilic acids and diamines. Characterizations were accomplished through elemental analyses, molecular weight determinations, infrared and multinuclear NMR studies to investigate their respective molecular structures. The spectral and computational studies are in good agreement with proposed framework of new complexes and supported an octahedral geometry around tin. Th e system described has been explored theoretically using molecular docking simulations. Th e complexes were screened against pathogenic fungi and bacterial strains. Some very active compounds were tested for anticancer activity against a panel of cell lines. Th e newly synthesized compounds displayed appreciable inhibitory potency in comparison with the standards.

Lissy Krishnan

Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, India

Title: Development and preclinical testing of protein-based curcumin delivery forms for control of cancer

Time : 14:55-15:15

Biography:

Lissy K. Krishnan focuses her research on development of various biotherapeutics from small pool human plasma meeting International regulatiory requirements for clinical use. Her approach to use various compositions of cell-specifi c fi brin matrix as an in vitro niche for human adult stem cell has resulted in their selection to homogenous population and differentiation into various cell types for use in regenerative medicine. She has also designed fi brin-based niche for in vivo delivery of partially differentiated cells for various cell-based therapy. She has developed two drug delivery systems using human plasma proteins; (i) albumin for systemic and (ii) fi brin for local curcumin delivery aiming at increasing bioavalability for cancer therapy. She also designed in vitro engineered cancer tissue using lung cancer cell and biodegradable scaffold to be used as model for testing anticancer effect of curcumin. She is the senior author of several peer reviewed publications, book chapters, conference proceedings, reviewed many manuscripts for various journals, serves in editorial boards, in project review committees of national funding agencies and is the primary inventor of national/International patents.

Abstract:

This lecture will address properties of plasma protein-based drug delivery systems with immense potential as anticancer agent. Curcumin (diferuloylmethane) is a well proven anti-infl ammatory, anti-oxidant and anticancer natural molecule with little clinical outcome due to poor aqueous solubility and lack of bioavailability. Diff erent approaches being attempted for eff ective delivery of this valuable drug at the aff ected site have not shown better clinical outcome. Recently, two drug delivery forms were developed using human proteins as drug carrier for: (i) local sustained release from fi brin matrix; (ii) systemic application as highly soluble Curcumin-albumin (Curc-Alb) conjugate. Potency of the curcumin released from fi brin and Curc-alb on in vitro proliferation and apoptosis were demonstrated using cancer cell lines, in vitro. Subsequently safe and effi cient use of the delivery systems for tumor prevention and reduction was demonstrated using Dalton’s lymphoma ascites (DLA) model in rats. Curcumin was non lethal/toxic when high acute dose was administered using both delivery forms. Sub-acute dose did not alter; liver/kidney functions as compared to normal controls. Drug administration aimed both tumor reduction and prevention of metastasis and in both the protocols it was comparable to the eff ect of standard drug doxorubicin. Remarkable reduction in tumor volume, tumor cell number and increase in mean survival time as compared to untreated tumor controls was observed and was similar to the action of standard drug. So the curcumin delivered in both forms appears safe and eff ective for human use. Th e potential of the drug and delivery systems for limited clinical trials will be discussed.

Jiusheng Deng

Emory University School of Medicine, USA

Title: Bioengineered Fusokine GIFT4 for cancer immunotherapy

Time : 15:15-15:35

Biography:

Deng received his PhD from Tel Aviv University School of Medicine in Israel in 2005. He completed his postdoc training in Massachusetts General Hospital Harvard Medical School and Emory University. He worked as a Research Associate in Stanford University School of Medicine. In 2011, Dr. Deng became an Instructor of Hematology and Medical Oncology in Winship Cancer Institute at Emory University. He has authored a number of peer-reviewed publications in the elite journals such as Cancer Research, Circulation, and Nature Immunology.

Abstract:

Emerging evidences show immunotherapy by enhancing our own immune system has become an attractive approach for cancer treatment due to the rapid drug resistance of chemotherapy. Fusion cytokines derived from GM-CSF and common γ-chain interleukins have potent gain-of-function properties to alter host immune response. Recently, we have generated a newly bioengineered fusokine GIFT4 that is derived from GM-CSF and IL-4, and tested the bioactivity of GIFT4 as a potential immunotherapeutic agent against caner. We observed that GIFT4 directly elicits anti-tumor adaptive B-cell immune response and consequent T cell immunity in vitro and in vivo. Murine GIFT4 expression suppresses melanoma tumor growth in immunologically intact mouse and administration of GIFT4 protein inhibits murine melanoma growth in vivo. GIFT4-B cell primed cytotoxic T cells from melanoma patients specifi cally kill human melanoma cells in vitro and in immune defi cient NSG mice. Th us, GIFT4 defines a novel engineered cytokine that mediates endogenous expansion of B-cells with potent anti-tumor eff ector function. We propose that GIFT4 protein could serve as a novel immunotherapeutic agent and defines a previously unrecognized potential of B-cells for personalized cancer cell immunotherapy. We expect that GIFT4 as an anti-melanoma agent will provide a novel strategy and opens a new avenue for human B cell-based immunotherapy against melanoma. We propose that GIFT4-B cells could serve as a potent immunotherapeutic agent and defi ne a previously unrecognized potential of B-cells for personalized cancer cell immunotherapy.

Biography:

Arlen serves as the Director of Scientifi c Affairs for Precision Biologics. He is involved in a consulting capacity, providing his renowned expertise as both senior scientifi c and clinical advisor for product development. He was trained as a cancer surgeon at Memorial Sloan-Kettering where he remained on staff for 20 years involved in the surgery of advanced cancer problems and the immunotherapeutic approaches to managing the patients. Dr. Arlen established the Surgical Oncology Division at North Shore University Hospital, and formed a practice group (North Shore Surgical Oncology Associates). He has written two major textbooks and published over 80 journal articles related to cancer treatment

Abstract:

The use of monoclonal antibodies has become an important aspect in planning for the treatment of the cancer patient and in particular those with metastatic pancreatic and colorectal cancer. It does require that the antibody be specifi c for an immunogenic target in the tumor cell. In the overall scheme, such an antibody should fi t into Lee Hartwells (Fred Hutchinson Cancer Center) description of a product (mAb) that can both detect specifi c tumor proteins with a high degree of accuracy for diagnosis and when confi rmed, be used as a therapeutic agent to target and destroy the malignancy. Antibodies for a large array of neoplasms are now in development at Precision Biologics. All are based on having been able to defi ne the immunogenic protein expressed by the tumor. Such proteins have been now been characterized for Pancreatic and Colon Cancer. Th ey have been shown in most instances to be oncofetal in origin. Th e primary immunogen, seen for the most part in both tumors, appears to be a post translational modifi cation of MUC5ac. Th e gene is turned on in thr fetus to produce needed intestinal mucin, and later prior to full fetal matur\\\\ation, the gene is remethylated. Failure to shut down this process induces the appearance of cytic fi brosis. In the adult, an oncogenic transformation modifi es the MUC5ac gene and the protein that is expressed, induces malignant transformation. Th e protein that is expressed as TAA, appears in the earliest phases of transformation to malignancy acting as a target for immunogenic diagnosis and therapeutic targeting. Th roughout progression of the lesion to the metastatic state, this TAA is not modifi ed and as such, that antibody targeting the primary tumor remains eff ective in addressing the metastatic lesion. In treating pancreatic and colorectal Ca we have shown that when the specifi c TAA is employed, enhancement in immune reactivity is essentially mediated via the humoral immune system. Cell mediated immunity takes a minor position. Th e antibody that we have employed for identifying the tumor target, that is Neo 102, has been shown to not only have a high rate of ADCC but induces apoptosis secondary to favtors defi ned by Annexin V binding. In our treatment of metastatic pancreatic cancer patients having failed Gemcitabine therapy, the addition of Abraxane has been shown to increase survival by approximately 8 wks. When monoclonal Neo 102 is delivered IV following Gemcitabine failure the average improvement in survival is approximately 26-30 wks. Realizing that many immunotherapeutic agents require removal or diminution of inhibitory serum factors that can be eff ected by chemotherapy, . new studies are being initiated. Th ese have been designed to compare Gemzar Abraxane vs. Gemzar Abraxane plus monolonal antibody (Neo 102). Later we will be initiating studies where patients have undergone surgery for pancreatic Ca. Following the eff ective removal of a primary pancreatic Ca by the Whipple procedure, the recurrence rate by 2 years post surgery can reach more than 90%. We have designed a peptide vaccine using the eiptope binding site defi ned by Phage Display which targets the mutated MUC5ac protein. Th e study is designed to provide vaccine one month post surgery and it is hoped to illustrate that the vaccine which produces the needed level of antibody by 4-6 months can prevent the high rate of recurrence that has been noted.

Break: Coffee Break 15:55 - 16:10 @ Foyer
Biography:

Lee has completed his PhD from KAIST, Korea and postdoctoral studies from the Korea Basic Science Insititute and the University of Pennsylvania. He is currently a research assistant professor of radiology at the University of Pennsylvania. His research areas are 1H, 31P and 13C NMR of cancer cells, xenograft models and patients for prediction and detection of therapeutic response. He has published ~20 papers in the peer reviewed journals

Abstract:

The lecture will deal with how NMR methods can be used to detect metabolic changes arising from signaling inhibitor drugs to cancer cells and translational possibilities to be used in the cancer patients. Signaling inhibitor drugs are the major targets of research in the basic science and in the clinic. Early fi nding out whether the targeted drug is working or not to individual patients is a much sought-aft er but not yet met need. Detecting altered metabolism aft er targeted drugs can be a promising strategy to solve it. We are studying metabolism upon signaling inhibitors to mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and bruton tyrosine kinase (BTK) in lymphoma cells and in vivo models. Changes in lactate (glycolysis), glutamate (TCA cycle) and alanine (glutaminolysis) were detectable by 1H and 13C NMR. In a drug resistant cancer cell line, decrease of lactate was accompanied by rebound of glutmate and alanine which suggests metabolic rewiring. On the other hand, in the drug sensitive cell line, all of the above metabolites decreased aft er the signaling inhibition. Time couse 13C NMR data allowed calculating absolute fl uxes in the individual metabolic pathways. We have a 1H MRS lactate imaging technique for cancer patients. Applying the technique to patients being treated with targeted drugs are our ongoing eff orts. Challenges and future directions will also be presented.

Biography:

Sherri Z Millis received her PhD in Biochemistry from the University of Wisconsin and her MS in Chemistry from the University of Colorado. She is the Director of Education at Advanced Individual Medicine (AIM) where she oversees the development of educational programs for physicians, health professionals, patients, and families to increase the understanding of personalized medicine in oncology. As a previous laboratory director, Millis designed and developed automated high throughput assays for discovery and development of oncology drugs and was co- or principle investigator on multiple studies leading the development of antimicrobials and novel vaccines in the fi ght against infectious diseases. In recent years, Dr. Millis has authored more than 50 research articles on breast, pancreatic, sarcoma, bladder, and very rare cancers, published in peer-reviewed journals. She has also served as faculty in health care and in the sciences at several universities over the last 20 years.

Abstract:

In the last few years with the advent of next generation sequencing, the commercial genetic and genomic testing off erings has grown signifi cantly. Multiple technologies have been employed to interrogate both familial variants and biomarker aberrations in cancer, including whole genome, whole exome, and hot spot sequencing. Th e various testing technologies are not equivalent. Th e spectrum is vast, from the number of genes interrogated, the exons (and introns) covered, the depth of sequencing, the types of genomic alterations detected, to the analytic and clinical validity. Even the accreditation, costs and reimbursement diff er. All these variables come in to play when trying to understand the limitations and strengths of each assay. Additionally, knowing when genetic and/or genomic testing is appropriate for ones patient must be included in the decision, when choosing which test to order. Interpretation of the report provided with the test results adds an additional level of complexity. Th ese reports oft en include complicated recommendations for treatment options. How these novel treatment options are generated diff ers, and determining which treatment options are relevant to consider can be overwhelming. identifi ed when utilizing genomic testing in oncology. Th e primary technologies, their similarities and diff erences, and the algorithms that inform many of the recommended treatment options will be described, along with issues in the reimbursement landscape.

Biography:

McCullough serves as the National Director of Humane Research and Therapy at American Humane Association. Her responsibilities encompass the promotion of this modality nationwide to benefi t our nation’s most vulnerable in specialized settings such as children’s hospitals and military family camps. She is the Principal Investigator for the Canines and Childhood Cancer Research Study and is a licensed Animal-Assisted Therapy Instructor and Evaluator. Amy holds a master’s degree from Queens University of Charlotte and a doctoral degree from the University of Denver with a focus in developing research to demonstrate the efficacy of animal-assisted therapy.

Abstract:

Purpose: While anecdotal evidence underscores the positive impact of therapy dogs for children with cancer and their families, rigorous studies of effi cacy are currently lacking, even as animal-assisted interventions (AAIs) occur daily in today’s pediatric oncology settings. Th is national, multi-site study is the fi rst of its kind to rigorously measure the psychosocial eff ects of AAIs for this population. Specifi cally, researchers are interested in whether or not AAIs have positive eff ects on patient stress, anxiety and health-related quality of life and on parent stress and anxiety, as well as whether or not therapy dogs experience distress during AAI sessions. Methods: Patients, aged 3-17 years and recently diagnosed with cancer, and their parents are randomly selected to receive either their standard of care treatment for their diagnosis only or their standard of care plus regular, 15 minute visits from a registered therapy dog and handler in the outpatient clinic or inpatient unit. Both study cohorts participate for 4 months by completing psychosocial and behavioral instruments at designated intervals. Children also have their blood pressure and pulse measured at the beginning and end of each session. Results: Since 2014, 49 patients/families and 31 therapy dog-handler teams have been enrolled across the 5 study sites. Preliminary patient, parent, and therapy dog fi ndings will be presented, as well as lessons regarding successfully implementing AAIs in pediatric oncology settings. Data collection for this study will continue through late 2015. Anticipated fi ndings from this groundbreaking research will increase access to therapy dogs in hospital environments, inform AAI best practices and standards in the context of serious pediatric illness and, most importantly, improve well-being outcomes for children and families facing the considerable challenges of childhood cancer.

Mehboob Ali

The Research Institute at Nationwide Children’s Hospital, USA

Title: Alterations in actin binding proteins and miR~17-92 cluster in cancer cell metastasis and attenuation by DHA

Time : 17:10-17:30

Biography:

Mehboob Ali has studied cancer cell biology and therapeutics for 5+ years and has authoredmore than 19 peer-researcharticles including book chapter. He has served as a reviewer for the peer reviewed Internationally recognized journals. Ali is a member of the several professional bodies including AACR, ATS, and ASCO and acted as a judge for poster session in scientifi c meetings. He has served as a borad member of postdoc research symposium (PRS) committee in between 2010-2013 and also as a senior vice president of Jefferson Postdoc Association (JPA) in between 2010-2013 at Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia.

Abstract:

The talk will cover ourcurrent investigationsfocused on characterizing actin binding proteins and their roles in the context of cancer cell metastasis and cell death. Recently, we demonstrated that the actin binding protein VASP, was diff erentially phosphorylated at S157 and S239 and this phosphorylation was associated with proliferation and invasive phenotypes. Furthnore, we have identifi ed interactions between the actin binding proteins profi lin1 and pVASP S157 as well as cofi lin1 and pVASP 239. Th ese interactions are associated with altered subcellular distribution, specifi cally nuclear localization. Interestingly, miR- 17~92 has been shown to be elevated in cancer models and we also observed elevations in our models. Profi lin and cofi lin are predicted targets of the miR-17~92 components which implies a possible link between changes in profi lin and cofi linexpression and miR-17~92. Moreover, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), a polyunsaturated fatty acid and dietary supplementis currently being investigated as a new and novel concept based therapy for cancer control. In our models, DHA supplementation was able tomodifying expression and subcellular distribution of actin binding proteins as well as decrease expression of the miR- 17~92 cluster. Our data identify novel, new modifi cations in actin binding protein expression and associations with miR-17~92 cluster that are attenuated by DHA supplementation. Collectively, these data indicate a therapeutic potential for DHA in modulatingin cancer cell survival and metastasis.

Elke Wagler

Department of General, Visceral and Oncosurgery, Pleißental-Klink Werdau, Germany

Title: Cytoreductive surgery and HIPEC for peritoneal carcinomatosis of a gallbladder carcinoma

Time : 17:30-17:50

Biography:

Elke Wagler, Department of General, Visceral and Oncosurgery, Pleißental-Klink Werdau, Germany

Abstract:

Introduction: Th e prognosis of gallbladder carcinoma is extremely poor as tumors usually do not show any symptoms until they have become advanced. As a result, in most cases the tumor cannot be removed by surgery completely. Th e fi ve-year survival rate of patients is approximately 6-7%. Aft er diagnosis the median survival time is approximately four to fi ve months. If the carcinoma is removed completely, the fi ve-year survival rate will increase to 10-60%. Methods: One female patient with gallbladder carcinoma who had a primary R1 resection of the gallbladder, partial liver tissue as well as the Whipple procedure, developed a small bowel ileus aft er three months. Th is occured due to a large nodular peritoneal carcinomatosis without evidence of extra peritoneal metastasis. A primary cytoreductive surgery was performed followed by HIPEC. Results: Th e intra- and postoperative progress was uncomplicated with primary wound healing. Th e patient received an additive systematic chemotherapy aft er the completion of her rehabilitation. Th e current staging shows no evidence of recarcinomatosis or metastasis. Conclusion: Th e HIPEC is a modern technique which can be used especially for patients with metastatic cancer. In the current literature there can be hardly found any information on the practice of HIPEC in patients with metastatic gallbladder or bile duct carcinoma. An accurate selection of a potential patient plays a key role.

Naomi Dolgoy

University of Alberta, Canada

Title: Supporting the survivors: Cancer fatigue syndome and cancer rehabilitation

Time : 17:50-18:10

Biography:

Naomi Dolgoy is a practising Occupational Therapist and a certifi ed Lymphatic Therapist at the Foothills Teaching Hospital in Calgary, Canada, and registered to practice in both Canada and the United States. She is concurrently working towards her PhD in Rehabilitative Medicine , at the University of Alberta, with a focus on Oncological Rehabilitation and Cancer Related Fatigue Syndrome. Naomi is an alumni of McGill University (Bachelor of Arts), and the University of British Columbia (Master of Occupational Therapy). In addition to her research, Naomi is actively developing programs and resources for the management of return to work and Cancer Related Fatigue Syndrome through functional rehabilitation; she serves as the consulting Occupational Therapist for the Cancer Fatigue Guideline working group for Cancer Control Alberta.

Abstract:

Medical advancements in cancer treatment change the way healthcare approaches ongoing patient care. Persons with cancer are now living longer with a greater attention to quality of life. With more cancer cases in remission, cancer is no longer viewed solely as a palliative condition; there is a strong focus on “survivorship”. Given that certain cancer cases present as chronic conditions, not necessarily as acute or palliative diseases, it is vital to consider a chronic care approach for long term interventions. Rehabilitation following cancer treatment is a crucial aspect of healthcare to transition patients dinto everyday life. Yet, beyond psychosocial and exercise based programs, there is a lack of functional or activity based rehabilitation. Research indicates that lasting fatigue is the most widely noted symptom associated with cancer and cancer treatments. Presently, the paucity of healthcare funding allocated to develop functional rehabilitation programs results in the absence of consistent intervention for this condition. Without functional therapies and occupational strategies to support management of home and work environments, many persons do not return to regular activity engagement, despite being disease survivors. Th e costly insurance required to support persons who cannot return to work post-treatment illustrates the need for effi cient and functional rehabilitation programs, furthering the rationale to develop this fi eld. Research is in process to extend the evidence and progress concrete rehabilitation programs. Th is presentation explores the potential benefi t of functional strategies for the management of cancer Related Fatigue Syndrome, identifying the diff erence between exercise versus activity based rehabilitation. Th e presentation will also highlight the gap in current services, emerging research in the area, and the germaine need to support return to work and rehabilitation programs.

Chung-Hsuan (Winston) Chen

Genomics Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taiwan

Title: Combining ultrasound and nanoparticle for cancer treatment

Time : 18:10-18:30

Biography:

Chung Hsuan Chen got his B.S. degree from Chemistry Department, National Taiwan University in 1969. He got his Ph. D in Chemical Physics from University of Chicago in 1974, Then, he went to Oak Ridge National Laboratory to become a research staff. In 1989, he became Group Leader of Photophysics.During his tenure at Oak Ridge National Lab, his major effort was placed on development of ultra-sensitive detection technology. They include the fi rst detection of single atom and isotope-selective atom counting. He is also one of the pioneers in developing mass spectrometry for DNA analysis and sequencing. His recent research has focused on novel mass spectrometry technology developments including cell mass spectrometer, accelerator mass spectrometer and portable biomolecular mass spectrometer. In 2007, he was appointed as Director of Genomics Research Center in Academia Sinica. He also has adjunct professor appointment at Chemistry Department, National Taiwan University. He has published more than ~250 papers in referred journals. He obtained 3 R&D-100 (100 top inventions in the year worldwide) awards, He was elected as Fellow of American Physical Society in 1993, and AAAS in 2009 due to his contribution on ultrasensitive detection technology development. He was elected as Academician of Academia Sinica in 2010.

Abstract:

We will present the concept and data for a cancer-specifi c treatment that combines ultrasound and nanoparticles to induce cytotoxicity in cancer cells relative to normal cells. Co-cultures of BEAS-2B normal lung cells and A549 cancerous lung cells labeled with green- and red-fl uorescent proteins respectively, were treated with focused ultrasound beams with the addition of gold and magnetic nanoparticles. Th ere were signifi cantly more necrotic A549 cells than BEAS-2 cells when gold nanoparticles were added to the culture medium. Th is selective damage to cancer cells was also observed for MDAMB231 breast cancer cells compared with MCF-10A normal breast cells aft er treatment with magnetic nanoparticles. Th e data obtained for diff erent cell lines indicate that nanoparticle-assisted ultrasound therapy could be an eff ective new tool for cancerspecific treatment and could potentially be combined with conventional methods of cancer diagnosis and therapy to further increase the overall cancer cure rate.