Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 13th Asia-Pacific Oncologists Annual Meeting Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Chieko Kai

University of Tokyo, Japan

Keynote: A Novel Oncolytic Modified Measles Virus Is A Promising Candidate For Cancer Therapy

Time : 09:30-10:00

Conference Series Asia Pacific Oncologists 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Chieko Kai photo
Biography:

Chieko Kai is a full Professor and Director of Animal Research Center, Institute of Medical Science, the University of Tokyo since 1999, and is also a Professor of International Research Center for Infectious Diseases, in the same institute. She is a member of Science Council of Japan. Her major interests are mechanisms of pathogenisity of RNA viruses, and to control viral diseases. Her current research focus is on developing a novel cancer therapy using oncolytic viruses by genetic engineering.

Abstract:

Oncolytic virus therapy is a promising therapy for various tumor types. We previously reported that a wild-type measles virus (MV) efficiently infects and shows high oncolytic activity to breast cancer cells. Since wild type MV infects immune cells using signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM) as a receptor, and causes its pathogenicity in host animals, we generated a recombinant MV selectively unable to use SLAM (rMV-SLAMblind). The rMV-SLAM blind lost infectivity to lymphoid cells, but maintained its infectivity to breast cancer cells using another receptor of MV, PVRL4 (poliovirus receptor related-4)/Nectin-4. Nectin-4 is hardly expressed in other tissues except placenta in healthy adults. Recent studies reported that Nectin-4 expression is up-regulated in various types of tumor cells, including breast cancer and non-small-cell lung cancer, which is the leading cause of cancer-related death. We examined the efficacy of rMV-SLAMblind on various cell lines derived from refractory cancers, in which Nectin-4/PVRL4 was expressed. The virus showed high oncolytic activity against them and also effectively suppressed tumor mass growth in xenotransplanted immunodeficient mice. Thus, rMV-SLAMblind should be a promising candidate of a novel therapeutic agent for caner treatment.

Keynote Forum

Fazlul H. Sarkar

Wayne State University, USA

Keynote: Mechanistic role of BR-DIM in human prostate cancer: Clinical experience

Time : 10:00

Conference Series Asia Pacific Oncologists 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Fazlul H. Sarkar photo
Biography:

Dr. Sarkar has completed his Ph.D at the age of 26 years from Banaras Hindu University andcontinued postdoctoral studies at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Institute in New York. He has published 555 peer-reviewed research articles and review articles, and also published 50 book chapters. He edited four books and he is an Academic Editor for PLoS One, and alsoserves in the editorial board of 10 cancer journals. His basic science research led to drugdiscovery and he is an expert in conducting translational research including clinical trials.

Abstract:

Prostate cancer (PCa) is treated with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) but it becomes refractory and leads to metastasis (mCRPC) which is incurable, suggesting that innovative treatment options are urgently needed. We found deregulated expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) such as miR-34a, miR-124, miR-27b, miR-320 and the let-7 family, and it appears to play important roles in regulating androgen receptor (AR) splice variant expression. The miR-320 and let-7 family inhibit the expression of stem cell markers such as Lin28B, EZH2, Nanog, Oct4 and CD44, which are associated with enzalutamide resistance, and thus could be responsible for the development of mCRPC. These dysregulations can be attenuated by treatment of PCa cells with 3,3’-Diindolylmethane (BR-DIM), which led to conduct a clinical trial. In the phase II clinical trial with localized PCa pateints were treated with BR-DIM at a dose of 225 mg orally twice daily for a minimum of 14 days. DIM levels and AR activity were measured at the time of prostatectomy. Moreover, we also assessed the level of expression of miRNAs and the expression of AR and its splice variants in the radical prostatectomy specimens and compared it with diagnostic biopsy specimens.   We found that BR-DIM treatment caused down regulation in the expression of AR, AR splice variants, Lin28B and EZH2, which appears to be mediated through the re-expression of let-7, miR-27b and miR-320 and miR-34a in human PCa specimens after BR-DIM treatment. In summary, our results provides the scientific basis for a “proof-of-concept” for therapeutic clinical trial for achieving better treatment outcome which will have a significant impact on the management of PCa patients.

  • Pathophysiology of Cancer l Oropharyngeal cancer l Cancer Therapy l Nursing Oncology l Breast Oncology
Location: Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

Session Introduction

AbdulAziz AlHamad

radiation oncology Consultant at Prince Sultan Military Medical City, Saudi Arabia

Title: Overview of cosmetic outcome of hypofractionated breast irradiation vs. chest wall irradiation in Saudi female: Single institute experience
Speaker
Biography:

AbdulAziz AlHamad, MD FRCP (C)–Radiation Oncology is a Consultant of Radiation Oncology at Prince Sultan Military Medical City, Saudi Arabia.

Abstract:

Introduction: Hypofractionated breast irradiation became as standard option; however, many limitations restrict such regimen like the safety for chest wall & lymphatic irradiation. In this trial, we would evaluate our result for cosmetic outcome for our breast cancer patients who have been treated with hypofractionated regimen.

Method: We did prospective study of single institute, with total of 75 patients of breast cancer who underwent adjuvant hypofractionated radiotherapy either for breast or chest wall irradiation ± lymphatic irradiation. All patients received 42.4/16fx ± boost of 10Gy/4 fx. We did evaluate their acute dermatitis and skin pigmentation according to CTC 3.0 by the last day of radiotherapy and late skin dermatitis & skin pigmentations on follow up assessment at 6 & 18 weeks post therapy. Then we compared the outcome for both groups in regard of each outcome.

Result: Out of 75 female patients of breast cancer (34 patients (45.33%) had lumpectomy) vs. (41 patients 54.66% had mastectomy) for the acute dermatitis, there was no significant difference between both groups (p value=0.14), for late skin dermatitis again there was no significant difference (p value=0.159). For acute skin pigmentation, there was no significant difference (p value=0.283), while for the late skin pigmentation there was significant difference (p value=0.028) in favor of patients who had hypofractionated breast irradiation.

Conclusion: Our prospective trial revealed that adjuvant hypofractionated radiotherapy is safe practice for patients who underwent lumpectomy or mastectomy with caution to late skin pigmentation, further proper randomized trial is demanded for proper assessment of therapeutic & cosmetic outcome for hypofractionated radiotherapy.

 

Mauricio Camus A

Associate Professor,Pontifical Catholic University of Chile, Chile

Title: Breast papillary lesions: an analysis of 70 cases
Speaker
Biography:

Mauricio Camus A is a Breast Surgeon, Associate Professor, and Chief of the Department of Surgical Oncology, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile. He is the President of Chilean Society of Mastology during 2014-2016; President of Federation of Cancerology Societies of South America (2012-2014); Vice-president Chilean Society of Surgeons (2010-2012); President Chilean Society of Cancerology (2008-2010). He is an active member of the Board of the Senologic International Society and President of the Scientific Committee of the Latin American Federation of Mastology. He has published 18 papers in reputed international journals and 35 papers in Chilean journals. He has been serving as an Editorial Board Member of 2 repute journals.

Abstract:

Introduction: Papillary breast lesions are rare and constitute less than 10% of benign breast lesions and less than 1% of breast carcinomas.

Objective: To analyze the clinical presentation, preoperative evaluation, and surgical and anatomopathological characteristics of the patients operated on for papillary breast lesions.

Material & Methods: It is a retrospective descriptive and analytical study. We analyzed the database of patients with definitive histopathological diagnosis of papillary breast lesions operated on at our institution from January 2004 to May 2013.

Results: During the period described, 70 patients with histopathological diagnosis of papillary breast lesions were operated upon. The median age was 50 years (19–86 years). Thirty-seven patients (52.8%) were symptomatic at diagnosis. Preoperative ultrasound was reported to bealtered in all patients. A mammography showed pathologic findings in only 50% of cases. All patients underwent partial mastectomy, afterneedle localization under ultrasound, if the lesion was not palpable on physical examination. The final pathological diagnosis was: benignpapillary lesion in 55 patients (78.6%) and malignant in 15 patients (21.4%). Adjuvant treatment was performed in all malignant cases. Median follow-up was 46 months (3–115 months).

Conclusions: Patients with papillary breast lesions presented with symptoms in half of all cases. There was a high frequency of malignancy (21.4%), therefore surgical resection was recommended for papillary breast lesions.

Speaker
Biography:

Christian Ntizimira is the Head of Advocacy & Research department of Rwanda Palliative Care and Hospice Organization and worked with Rwanda Ministry of Health and Consultant in Palliative Care for Human Rights Watch (HRW) in Senegal. He is a Palliative Care Expert and Educator. He pioneered integration of end of life care into health services rendered to Rwandan patients with chronic illnesses in acute care and community settings. He is a Research Collaborator & Member of the Scientific Advisory Committee of the Harvard Global Equity Initiative-Lancet Commission on Global Access to Pain Control and Palliative Care (GAPPCP).

Abstract:

Multi-disciplinary palliative care for patients with any cancer is rarely integrated into the public healthcare system at all levels in Africa. In Rwanda, we have developed palliative care services in a district general hospital and linked these services to home care. In a public district hospital that includes 60% of the population of Kigali, we initiated adult and pediatric pain relief and palliative care programs for cancer patients with short-term technical assistance and training by foreign experts. Available services include inpatient and home care provided by physicians, nurses, social workers and pharmacists with basic training in palliative care and home hospice care provided by a private home hospice organization. As of March 2015, more than 200 patients had received inpatient palliative care. Anecdotal data indicates a high level of satisfaction by patients and family members with palliative care services provided and a reduced tendency of patients with end-stage diseases to pursue costly treatment abroad. In Africa, palliative care is not optional. It is not an extra, an ‘add-on’, a luxury or an after-thought. It is an essential component of human cancer care. To develop cancer treatments without parallel development of palliative care is a cruel injustice to the millions of cancer patients around the world who suffer needlessly. In every country, it is absolutely essential that when people talk about access to radiotherapy and cervical cancer screening and chemotherapy- all vitally important- they must also be talking in equal measure and with equal conviction about access to palliative care.

Speaker
Biography:

Devishree V Rai has completed her BDS degree from A B Shetty Memorial Institute of Dental Sciences & Hospital and is presently pursuing her MDS degree from SDM College of Dental Sciences & Hospital. She has presented poster titled “Virtopsy” for the National Conference held in Lucknow. She has presented case report on “Acromegaly” in PG Convention held in Bangalore. She has presented case report on “Odontogenic Myxoma” in a National Conference held in Mangalore. She has also been awarded the research grant from Indian Council of Medical Research for her dissertation.

Abstract:

Oral cancer imposes a considerable problem worldwide being a highly lethal and disfiguring disease. According to the report of the World Health Organization, oral cancer is the sixth most common cancer worldwide and the most common intraoral subtype is squamous cell carcinoma. The formation or progression of oral cancer may be associated with a polymorphism of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) gene. OSCC was associated with significantly elevated serum VEGF concentration and higher level of serum VEGF also correlated with lymph node metastasis and clinical stage of OSCC. There have been association of VEGF-460C/T polymorphism in oral cancer, diabetic retinopathy, breast cancer, prostate cancer, but very few studies are known to validate the association of the VEGF gene with potentially premalignant conditions like oral submucous fibrosis. The most frequently seen polymorphism is BstUI (C to T) located at the -460th nucleotide upstream of the VEGF gene. With the malignant transformation rate of OSMF being 7-30%, VEGF gene -460C/T can become an important prognostic marker. The aim of our study was to assess the polymorphic nature of VEGF -460C/T gene in subjects with oral submucous fibrosis of North Karnataka population and analyze the comparison between the association of VEGF -460C/T polymorphism in patients with oral submucous fibrosis and healthy controls.

Kahlil Lawless

Product Marketing Manager, Illumina Inc, Singapore

Title: Frontiers of Next Generation Sequencing in Translational Oncology
Speaker
Biography:

Kahlil Lawless studied Biomedical Science at Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand. Following a scholarship at Australia National University he conducted research for the state government of Victoria in Melbourne, and now works for Illumina in the South-Asia Pacifi c Region as a Product Marketing Manager with a focus on the use of genomics in Oncology.

Abstract:

The steep drop in price and increases in output of Next Generation Sequencing (NGS), as well as the emergence of new methods and studies, are at the forefront in changing our understanding and management of cancer. Kahlil Lawless from Illumina delves into the opportunities and challenges of applying NGS to oncology practice, and highlights recent publications around large-scale initiatives, innovative techniques, and the promise of precision medicine. Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) technologies continue to deliver new insights into cancer biology, and these are being increasingly leveraged to develop new therapies and testing methods to support management of cancer. We review come recent translational studies where Illumina NGS has been used, and evaluate the potential challenges and benefi ts associated with routine adoption of these methods in practice.

Speaker
Biography:

Craig Pierson earned his BSc in Zoology from the University of Canterbury, New Zealand. His work started with Ovine Linkage Mapping projects while at AgResearch in Dunedin and continued into genome sequencing while at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston. He has trained and supported customers in Sanger sequencing, qPCR, NGS, and gene expression applications while at Applied Biosystems, Illumina, HTG, VelaDx and ArcherDx. He joined the ArcherDX team as a Field Application Specialist in July, 2015.

Abstract:

The landscape of driver mutations in cancer encompasses many types of mutations occurring across many genes. These include copy number variants (CNVs), single nucleotide variants (SNVs), insertions and deletions (indels), exon skipping and gene fusions. Traditional molecular testing to detect each of these mutation types in clinical samples cannot be easily coupled to detect all possible mutation types in a single sample. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) on whole transcriptome (RNA-Seq) enables comprehensive profiling of expressed mutations. However, low sensitivity and high cost renders RNA-Seq impractical for routine clinical use. Target-enrichment strategies for NGS, such as Anchored Multiplex PCR (AMP™), increase read depth and enhance sensitivity. AMP uses unidirectional gene-specific primers and molecular barcoded adapters ligated to DNA ends for amplification. This enables amplification of both known and unknown mutations and increases coverage of target regions. We developed AMP-based Archer® FusionPlex® assays to detect the presence and expression of known and novel SNVs, indels, exon skipping and fusions from RNA transcripts. Here, we used FusionPlex assays to detect each mutation type in RNA extracted from clinical sample types, including: EGFR L858R SNV in a non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) FFPE sample; FLT3 internal tandem duplications (ITDs) in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) blood samples; MET exon 14 skipping in NSCLC FFPE samples and; EML4-ALK fusion in an NSCLC FFPE sample by breakpoint identification and expression imbalance. Together, these results demonstrate that FusionPlex assays enable comprehensive NGS-based detection of expressed mutations in RNA extracted from clinical sample types.

Speaker
Biography:

Sarita Das has completed her MSc in Biotechnology from KIIT University, India and is currently pursuing PhD in Cancer Biology from KIIT University, India. She has published 3 research papers in international journals.

Abstract:

Based on the pharmacophoric features of the natural product, combretastatin A-4 (CA-4) and its synthetic analogues that inhibit tubulin polymerization, a series of novel 2-aryl-3-arylamino-imidazo-pyridines/pyrazines as potential antitubulin anticancer agents were designed. They were synthesized by a one-pot method involving preparation of isocyanides from the anilines via formylation and subsequent dehydration followed by their reactions with heterocyclic-2-amidines and aldehydes. Compounds 1, 2, 14, and 15 were found to exhibit significant tubulin polymerization inhibition and disruption of tubulin–microtubule dynamics similar to that of CA-4. They showed potent anticancer activities in kidney, breast and cervical cancer cell lines, and relatively low toxicity to normal cells, compared to CA-4. The compounds induced DNA and chromosomal damage, and apoptosis via cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase. The molecular docking and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation studies revealed that disruption of microtubule dynamics might occur by interaction of the compounds at the colchicine binding site at the a,b-tubulin heterodimer interface, similar to that of CA-4. Molecular modelling analysis showed that two of the three methoxy groups at ring A of all four potent compounds (1, 2, 14, and 15) were involved in bifurcated hydrogen bonding with Cysb241, an important molecular recognition interaction to show tubulin inhibitory activity. In comparison to CA-4, the bridging NH and the imidazo-pyridine/pyrazine moieties in the title compounds provide flexibility for attaining the required dihedral relationship of two aryls and additional pharmacophoric features required for the interaction with the key residues of the colchicine binding site.

Speaker
Biography:

He is a working as a Research Scholar from Toho University, Japan. Makoto Sumazaki is extending his valuable service as a Research Scholar in Breast and Endocrine Surgery for years and has been a recipient of many award and grants. His research experience includes various programs, contributions and participation in different countries for diverse fields of study. His research interests as a Researcher reflect in his wide range of publications in various national and international journals.

Abstract:

Invasive lobular carcinomas have an increased propensity for distant metastases, particularly to the peritoneum, ovaries, and uterus. In contrast, distant metastases of nonpalpable lobular carcinomas are extremely rare, and the causes of underlying symptoms of primary carcinomas remain unclear. We report a case of an asymptomatic invasive lobular carcinoma with a primary mammary lesion in a patient with rectal stenosis. Peritoneal metastasis from nonpalpable invasive lobular carcinomas is very rare. However, breast cancer metastasis should be considered when carcinomatous peritonitis is present in a patient with an unknown primary cancer. A 69-year-old woman presented to us for treatment of constipation. Although rectal stenosis was confirmed, thorough testing of her lower digestive tract did not identify its cause. Thus, an exploratory laparotomy and tissue biopsy was performed, and the presence of an invasive lobular carcinoma was confirmed. Subsequent breast examinations showed that the invasive lobular carcinoma that led to the rectal stenosis was a metastasis from a primary lesion of the breast duct. As the present breast lobular carcinoma was asymptomatic and nonpalpable, we did not initially consider metastatic breast cancer as a cause of her symptoms.       

Speaker
Biography:

Syed Mozammel Hossain has completed his FCPS in Surgery from BCPS Bangladesh. He is working at Khulna Medical College and Hospital since 1998. Currently, he is the Associate Professor and Head of the Department of the Surgery unit of Khulna Medical College and Hospital. He has published more than 30 papers in well reputed national and international journals and has been serving as an Assistant Editor of BMA journal. He is doing collaborative research on breast cancer for last 10 years with International Breast Cancer Research Foundation, USA.

Abstract:

In premenopausal women with metastatic hormone receptor-positive breast cancer, hormonal therapy is the first-line therapy. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogue+tamoxifen therapies have been found to be more effective. The pattern of recurrence risk over time after primary surgery suggests that peri-operative factors impact recurrence. Secondary analyses of an adjuvant trial suggested that the luteal phase timing of surgical oophorectomy in the menstrual cycle simultaneous with primary breast surgery favourably influenced long-term outcomes. 249 premenopausal women with incurable or metastatic hormone receptor-positive breast cancer entered a trial in which they were randomised to historical mid-luteal or mid-follicular phase surgical oophorectomy followed by oral tamoxifen treatment. Kaplane Meier methods, the log-rank test and multivariable cox regression models were used to assess overall and progression-free survival (PFS) in the two randomised groups and by hormone-confirmed menstrual cycle phase. Overall survival (OS) and PFS were not demonstrated to be different in the two ran- domised groups. In a secondary analysis, OS appeared worse in luteal phase surgery patients with progesterone levels <2 ng/ml (anovulatory patients; adjusted hazard ratio 1.46, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.89-2.41, p=0.14) compared with those in luteal phase with progesterone level of 2 ng/ml or higher. Median OS was two years (95% CI: 1.7e2.3) and OS at four years was 26%. The history-based timing of surgical oophorectomy in the menstrual cycle did not influence outcomes in this trial of metastatic patients.

Vincent Balaya

Unit Development Research, Imaging and Anatomy, France

Title: Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy in cervical cancer: an update
Speaker
Biography:

Balaya Vincent is resident of Obstetrics/Gynecology in the Department of Gynaecological, Oncological and Breast Surgery at Georges Pompidou European Hospital in Paris and researcher at the Human Anatomy Department at University Paris Descartes.

Abstract:

Uterine cervical cancer is the second gynaecological cancer worldwide. Its incidence started remarkably dropping in developed countries where it is mostly constituted of early stages that are associated with good prognosis. As a consequence, the major concern became to find ways to improve the quality of life of the affected patients and to limit the considerable iatrogenic morbidities resulting from the treatments provided primarily pelvic lymphadenectomy. Sentinel lymph node biopsy was developed for this aim.

     Normally a  sentinel  node  corresponds  to the first  node  that  drains  a solid  tumour  as  such;  its status is considered representative of the status of the other draining  nodes.  The objective of this technique is to perform a selective sentinel lymph node sampling while preserving the remaining lymph nodes in a way to limit the morbidities mostly those related to the lymphatic drainage. It was shown in the literature that the combined isotopic and colorimetric technique with the capacity of pre and intra-operative detection was an applicable strategy with an excellent detection rate and diagnostic value and with minimal false negative results when it comes to bilateral detection. This combined technique also puts into evidence the aberrant drainage territories that are not systematically picked during lymphadenectomies and can be the source for future recurrence. Another advantage to be added to the list is lymph node ultra-staging; this anatomopathological processing is performed over a limited number of nodes and aims at detecting the micrometastases that can be missed on the routine processing performed over lymphadenectomies specimen and that are of major prognostic importance. Concerning the indications, sentinel lymph node biopsy concerns patients with early stage cervical cancer and with small tumour size. Novel methods like fluorescence and SPECT-CT are now being investigated as new strategies of detection aiming at the improvement and implementation of this technique in the daily practice.

Early stage uterine cervical cancer is associated with a good prognosis, especially in patients without nodal metastases. The management should take into consideration the quality of life of patients by reducing the iatrogenic morbidities related to the treatment. Sentinel lymph node biopsy can solve this drawback. The combined technique proved itself as a feasible strategy with excellent detection rates and diagnostic value.

Speaker
Biography:

Ivy Chung completed her PhD from State University of New York at Buffalo and Postdoctoral studies from Children’s Hospital Boston, Harvard Medical School, Boston. She currently is an Associate Professor in Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur. She is also the Deputy Dean of Wellness Research Cluster for the Institute Management of Research and Innovation in the same university. She is actively looking to expand her collaborative network in various aspect of oncology research in this region.

Abstract:

Cancer was once thought to be a ‘stand-alone’ malignancy where we treat patients with drugs that target only cancer cells. Recently, more evidence is showing that cancer cells do not thrive alone, they rely on their environment to maintain their survival and to progress into an aggressive state. We found that cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) isolated from human endometrial cancer (EC) tissues secreted high levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6), which promotes EC cell proliferation in vitro. Neutralizing IL-6 activity reduced while IL-6 recombinant protein increased EC cell proliferation.  IL-6 receptors (IL-6R and gp130) were expressed only in EC epithelial cells but not in CAF, indicating a one-way paracrine signaling. In the presence of CAFs, Janus kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription (JAK/STAT3) pathway was activated in EC cells, which led to induction of a target gene, c-Myc protein. CAFs-mediated cell proliferation was dependent on c-Myc expression, as RNAi-mediated c-Myc down-regulation led to a significant reduction in cell viability. The effect of CAFs in promoting EC cell proliferation was also evident in a subcutaneous tumor xenograft model. Further investigation showed that IL-6 receptors, phosphorylated-STAT3 and c-Myc were highly expressed in human EC tissues than in benign endometrium. Taken together, our data suggests that IL-6 secreted by CAF induces c-Myc expression to promote EC proliferation in vitro and in vivo. IL-6 pathway can be a potential target to disrupt tumor-stroma interaction in endometrial cancer progression.